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Land Acknowledgement for Shoreline Community College: Citing Indigenous Elders

By noting the indigenous tribes that dwell and have culturally imbued the location of the college, we are sending a powerful message of respect towards the Coast Salish Peoples, in particular the Duwamish tribe.

Citations are used to Give Credit

What is a Citation?

A citation gives information about where quoted or paraphrased information came from. When data, statistics, graphs, or charts are used, a citation tells the reader about where the research came from and who published it.

How Do I Cite a Indigenous Elder or Knowledge Keeper?

Unlike most other personal communications, Elders and Knowledge Keepers should be cited in-text and in the reference list.

  1. Last name, First name
  2. Nation/Community
  3. Treaty Territory if applicable
  4. City/Community
  5. Topic/subject of communication
  6. Date Month Year

What Does a Indigenous Elder Citation Look Like? 

Cardinal, Delores., Goodfish Lake Cree Nation. Treaty 6. Lives in Edmonton. Oral teaching. 4 April 2004.

Approaching Indigenous Elders  

If you would like to approach an Elder or Knowledge Keeper for teachings, remember to follow protocol or if you are unsure what their protocol is, please ask them ahead of time.

Indigenous Elders

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