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Rules in the Library

This is a combination of library rules and campus guidelines that are enforced in the library.

Information Literacy Plan

Definition of Information Literacy

Information literacy is the ability to recognize when information is needed and to locate, evaluate, and effectively use the needed information. Inside the framework of Shoreline’s Information Literacy Program students will access, use and evaluate information in a variety of formats, keeping in mind social, legal and ethical issues surrounding information access in today's society.

According to the Association of College and Research Libraries Information Literacy Framework:

Information literacy forms the basis for lifelong learning.  It is common to all disciplines, to all learning environments, and to all levels of education. Information literacy is a spectrum of abilities, practices, and habits of mind that extends and deepens learning through engagement with the information ecosystem. It includes:

• understanding essential concepts about that ecosystem;

• engaging in creative inquiry and critical reflection to develop questions and to find, evaluate, and manage information through an iterative process;

• creating new knowledge through ethical participation in communities of learning, scholarship, and civic purpose; and

• adopting a strategic view of the interests, biases, and assumptions present in the information ecosystem.

 

Role of IL on College Campus

Information literacy is integral to the intellectual development of students at Shoreline Community College and is among the General Education Outcomes for the college. The library faculty collaborates with faculty among all disciplines to promote and instill Information Literacy outcomes into the curriculum.

Library Mission:

Our user-centered library is committed to teaching, creating, and managing powerful resources in collaboration with students, faculty, and staff. We connect people with knowledge and create lifelong independent learners.

 

 

Instruction Program Goals

We provide instructional programs to support our students’ wide range of educational goals and learning styles.  The library instruction program is designed to achieve the following goals:

 

  • Students develop information literacy skills that promote independence in pursuing information of both an academic and personal nature.  The program will facilitate this skill building through direct instruction, contact with the reference desk and building familiarity with the use of library resources.

  • Faculty will develop curricula that incorporate information literacy appropriate to student need.  In support of our mission, library faculty and the wider college will collaborate to allow for the evolution of IL curricula, to incorporate changing technology and to respond to our dynamic campus needs.

  • College community benefits from the instruction program both in and out of the classroom and contribute expertise and feedback so that the program achieves continued growth in relevant directions.

  • Classroom instruction typically 1-3 fifty minute workshops but these hours of classroom instruction can be implemented in other ways as the instructor and librarian see fit.

 

Targeted Classes for Instruction

 

English 101: English Composition I
Course description ENGL 101 (as of March 2013):  Students write essays that display focus, organization, appropriate style, and technical control. They develop skills in critical thinking and close reading of texts and respond in writing and discussion to assigned topics. 100, or equivalent with a 2.0 or better, or instructor permission. Student option grading

Desired Information Literacy learning outcomes for this course typically include:

  • Introduction to the library: physical and virtual tour facilitated by collage activity

  • Keyword Generation from Research Question

  • Synonym use for searching purposes

  • Conceptual understanding of the Internet

  • Evaluation of sources skill set

 

 The Framework Concepts applicable to the learning outcomes are:

Authority is Constructed and Contextual

Information Creation as Process

 

Classroom instruction typically 1-3 fifty minute workshops but these hours of classroom instruction can be implemented in other ways as the instructor and librarian see fit.

 

English 102: Composition II Writing from Research
Course description ENGL 102 (as of March 2013): Students write research essays on various topics. Using both traditional and new information technologies, they develop skills as researchers, critical thinkers and writers of documented analysis and argumentation. Themes of individual sections are available at the online English page. Prerequisites: Completion of ENGL& 101 with a grade of 2.0 or better. Student option grading.

Desired Information Literacy learning outcomes for this course typically include:

  • Develop strategies for selecting research topics, formulating research questions, and carrying out research.

  • Identify and use different kinds of secondary sources.

  • Use library and other search tools to identify research material.

  • Cultivate strategies for finding, organizing, and storing information.

  • Exercise critical thinking strategies for reading and understanding a variety of source types.     

  • Exercise critical thinking strategies for evaluating and understanding a variety of source types.

The Framework Concepts applicable to the learning outcomes are:

Information Creation as a process

Searching as strategic exploration

Scholarship As A Conversation

PSYC& 100: General Psychology

Course provides an introduction to the scientific study of the biological, mental, and social factors that influence human behavior. Topics covered include: personality, learning, memory, critical thinking, intelligence, psychological disorders, and treatments.

Desired Information Literacy learning outcomes for this course typically include:

  • Database Searching:

  • Boolean Searching, Keyword breakdown and derivation, narrowing capabilities

  • Identification and understanding of Scholarly/Peer Reviewed Scientific articles

  • Comprehension of the structure of Peer Reviewed scientific articles

  • Familiarity with the library webpage and how to access sources online

  • Understanding the difference between popular and academic periodical

 

The Framework Concepts applicable to the learning outcomes are:

Research as Inquiry

Scholarship is a Conversation

CMST & 101: Introduction to Communications

Students learn verbal, nonverbal and listening skills essential to effective living and become competent communicators by applying interpersonal, small group, public speaking, and cross-cultural communication theories to a variety of contexts including the workplace, communities, and families. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESL 100/ENGL 100 or higher.

Desired Information Literacy learning outcomes for this course typically include:

  • Exploration of the information/publication cycle

  • Introduction to reference materials-background researching skills

  • Familiarity with the library webpage and how to access sources online

  • Research question→Thesis statement processes

  • LP for the class speech that requires the most research (instructor dependent)

The Framework Concepts applicable to the learning outcomes are:

Information Creation as a Process

Research As Inquiry

Authority is Constructed and Contextual

CHEM 171 - General-Inorganic Chemistry I

First course of three quarters of Gen. Chem. for science and engineering majors. Includes scientific measurement, atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry, aqueous solutions and reactions, gas laws and theory, basic thermodynamics and nuclear chem. Course includes lecture and seminar. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 181 is required. Prerequisite: Recent high school chemistry or CHEM& 121 with a 2.0 or better and ENGL 099, EAP 099, or placement into ENGL& 101 and placement into MATH& 141; or instructor permission. Mandatory decimal grading.

Desired information literacy learning outcomes typically include:

  • Identify components of an evidence-based, scholarly article in a STEM field;

  • Describe the peer review process;

  • Search for and choose an evidence-based, peer-reviewed article from a STEM journal in a library database using keywords. The

Framework Concepts applicable to the learning outcomes are:

Authority is Constructed and Contextual

Information Creation as a Process

Scholarship as a conversation

Searching as strategic exploration

NURS 141 - Foundations of Nursing Practice

Describes organizing framework foundational to the nursing program. Concepts include: critical thinking, nursing process, patient-centered care, homeostasis, and environment with emphasis on human needs and lifespan regarding the older adult. Socialization into the nursing profession is emphasized. 

Desired information literacy learning outcomes typically include:

  • Identify components of an evidence-based peer-reviewed Nursing journal article;

  • Form APA citations

  • Effectively search nursing and other allied health resources for resources

The Framework Concepts applicable to the learning outcomes are:

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual

Information Creation as a Process

Information Has Value

Research as Inquiry

Scholarship as Conversation

Searching as Strategic Exploration

DENHY 161 - Periodontology I

The recognition and etiology of diseases of the periodontium. This is the first course in a series of three consecutive courses in periodontology, and provides fundamental knowledge in the field of dental hygiene. 

Desired information literacy learning outcomes typically include:

  • Identify components of an evidence-based peer-reviewed Nursing journal article;

  • Form APA citations

  • Effectively search allied health resources for resources

The Framework Concepts applicable to the learning outcomes are:

Authority Is Constructed and Contextual 

Information Creation as a Process 

Information Has Value 

Research as Inquiry 

Scholarship as Conversation 

Searching as Strategic Exploration

Updated: 4/13/2018

Contact: Claire Murata